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Sunday, July 20, 2014

Responding with Wonderment and Awe


This term our habit of mind is Responding with Wonderment and Awe. Here is my word cloud with synonyms for Wonderment and Awe.



Tuesday, July 1, 2014

FIFA World Cup!

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Jean Batten


Jean Batten was a famous New Zealander, well known for flying aeroplanes. She broke many world records for her solo flights in the 1930s

Jean was born on the 15th of September 1909 in Rotorua. She first became famous in the 1930s for her record breaking flights. Jean was interested in flight from a young age. She learnt how to fly a plane in England and set her first goal, to fly from England to New Zealand. She flew her first record-breaking flight in 1934, England to Australia, in 14 days, 22 hours and 30 minutes when she was 21. Jean was the first person to fly such a far distance and was a great role model for young pilots.

A year later, Jean repeated the flight, this time from Australia, and managed to complete it in 17 days and 15 hours. She was the first woman to make the return flight. Also in 1935, Jean flew from England to Brazil in 61 hours and 15 minutes. This was the fastest flight across the South Atlantic Ocean, and she was the first woman to complete the flight.

Jean has received many major awards. She was the only non-royal person to be presented with the Officer Of The Order Of The Southern Cross in Brazil. In France she received the Chevalier de Legion d'Honeur and in Britain, the Commander of the British Empire. She won the
Women’s International Association Of Aeronautics Challenge Cup  for three years in a row in the United States.
After the 1930s, Jean’s fame started dropping. She lived a quieter life after her years of flying. She lived in Europe but made many visits to New Zealand. Jean passed away in 1982, at the age of 73, from an infectious dog bite. She had died in Palma, Majorca, and it took until 1987 for the news to get back to New Zealand. She was buried in Palma cemetery on 22 January, 1983 in a paupers’ mass grave.

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Week 9 Term 2

This week we have been learning about Matariki. When Matariki is present in the sky, it shows that the Maori new year has come. The Maori new year is a time to remember people and spend time with your family and friends to celebrate a brand new year. The Maori new year is tomorrow, Saturday the 28th of June. Room 5 went on a trip to the museum and a maori lady called Awhina showed us some pictures of what the Maori new year is all about. We got told about how the stars help people determine whether it will be a good season or a bad season for planting and harvesting crops. You can tell by examining if the stars are blurry or clear. If the stars are blurry, it is most likely to be a cold and bad season.

Last Sunday, I played basketball for the Carlton Bulls. There are 8 people in the Bulls, but only 5 members turned up to the game. Last Friday, 5 of the people who had turned up to every game, Tomairangi, Tyra-Lee, Nikita, Nesian and I, got a prize. We got some lollies, chips, and some MTV stationery. I thought more people would turn up to the game on Sunday, but the same 5 people and no-one else turned up so we had no subs. Again.

Yesterday, we played soccer on the field. It was kind of fun, apart from that nobody would pass the ball to me, and I had to be goalie. Have you seen games in the F.I.F.A World Cup? Or any soccer game? They actually pass to their goalie so they can kick it to the other end. Goalies are useful because they are the only players who can pick up the ball mid-game, apart from people who have to do a throw-in. I want to be the referee next time we play so I can make sure everybody gets an even turn. Our team lost 2-0 even though the ball was down our end the majority of the time.

I got to write a story for today's newsletter. I wrote about recycling and what we had been learning with Matua Hadi. If you would like to read my story, it is on my blog, under the name ‘Recycling’. If you have got the latest Carlton newsletter, you can read it in there.

And that is what has happened this week in the Clubhouse!

Recycling

Over the past few weeks, we have been learning about recycling. A man called Matua Hati came to talk to us about what can be recycled and what can't be recycled. Everything you don't recycle ends up in landfill. In landfill, all non recyclable rubbish is dumped into a big hole and when that hole is full, it get covered with dirt and grass to become land. Some people have to live on landfills. Pipes coming out of the ground make sure the methane doesn't get trapped under the ground because otherwise the whole landfill could explode. With Matua Hati, we watched a video showing how Coca-Cola factories recycle their own products to produce more bottles. If you bought a bottle of Coke, you could also be buying other soft drink bottles recycled in the material. We got to inspect recyclable materials and play some recycling games so we knew more about how to recycle and look after our environment.

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Week 8 Term 2

This week we have been learning about recycling. A man called Matua Hati came to talk to us about what can be recycled and what can't be recycled. Everything you don't recycle ends up in landfill. In landfill, all unrecyclable rubbish is dumped into a big hole and when that hole is full, it get covered with dirt and grass to become land. Some people have to live on landfills. Pipes coming out of the ground make sure the methane doesn't get trapped under the ground because otherwise the whole landfill could explode. With Matua Hati, we watched a video showing how Coca-Cola factories recycle their own products to produce more bottles. If you bought a bottle of Coke, you could also be buying other soft drink bottles in the material.

We also went on a trip to the museum to recycle some old paper strips to make brand new coloured and recycled paper. We made three pieces of paper, a blue piece, a red piece and an orange piece with coloured strips of paper. We also got shown some clothing made with recycled bread bags. The adult helpers, including my dad, modeled the clothes.

For our homework, we had to make anything out of recycled materials. I made a birdhouse out of a milk bottle, a straw and a peanut-butter jar lid. Other people made gardens, money boxes and someone bought an ice cream container with a plastic Rex from Toy Story on top. This challenge for 'Hands on Homework' is similar to when we had to make a boat out of materials. Thinking about that now, if the S.S Trina was still in ship-shape, (no pun intended) I could have just bought it instead, with lots of time to spare for my other homework.